Ariel wanted them to become part of our world. Spiders have six too many of them. Taylor Swift has them for days ... the answer is LEGS! A notable set of stems can be the very definition of your character. After all, no one knows what the Wicked Witch of the East's face looks like, right? Bottom line: Friends don't let friends skip leg day … because any costume that's short enough to show off your tan lines is going to get a laugh.
American historian and author Ruth Edna Kelley of Massachusetts wrote the first book-length history of Halloween in the US; The Book of Hallowe'en (1919), and references souling in the chapter "Hallowe'en in America".[149] In her book, Kelley touches on customs that arrived from across the Atlantic; "Americans have fostered them, and are making this an occasion something like what it must have been in its best days overseas. All Halloween customs in the United States are borrowed directly or adapted from those of other countries".[150]
^ Jump up to: a b Pulliam, June; Fonseca, Anthony J. (26 September 2016). Ghosts in Popular Culture and Legend. ABC-CLIO. p. 145. ISBN 978-1440834912. Since the 16th century, costumes have become a central part of Halloween traditions. Perhaps the most common traditional Halloween costume is that of the ghost. This is likely because ... when Halloween customs began to be influenced by Catholicism, the incorporation of the themes of All Hallows' and All Souls' Day would have emphasized visitations from the spirit world over the motifs of spirites and fairies. ... The baking and sharing of souls cakes was introduced around the 15th century: in some cultures, the poor would go door to door to collect them in exchange for praying for the dead (a practice called souling), often carrying lanterns made of hollowed-out turnips. Around the 16th century, the practice of going house to house in disguise (a practice called guising) to ask for food began and was often accompanied by recitation of traditional verses (a practice called mumming). Wearing costumes, another tradition, has many possible explanations, such as it was done to confuse the spirits or souls who visited the earth or who rose from local graveyards to engage in what was called a Danse Macabre, basically a large party among the dead.

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Lesley Bannatyne and Cindy Ott both write that Anglican colonists in the Southern United States and Catholic colonists in Maryland "recognized All Hallow's Eve in their church calendars",[117][118] although the Puritans of New England maintained strong opposition to the holiday, along with other traditional celebrations of the established Church, including Christmas.[119] Almanacs of the late 18th and early 19th century give no indication that Halloween was widely celebrated in North America.[120] It was not until mass Irish and Scottish immigration in the 19th century that Halloween became a major holiday in North America.[120] Confined to the immigrant communities during the mid-19th century, it was gradually assimilated into mainstream society and by the first decade of the 20th century it was being celebrated coast to coast by people of all social, racial and religious backgrounds.[121] "In Cajun areas, a nocturnal Mass was said in cemeteries on Halloween night. Candles that had been blessed were placed on graves, and families sometimes spent the entire night at the graveside".[122] The yearly New York Halloween Parade, begun in 1974 by puppeteer and mask maker Ralph Lee of Greenwich Village, is the world's largest Halloween parade and one of America's only major nighttime parades (along with Portland's Starlight Parade), attracting more than 60,000 costumed participants, two million spectators, and a worldwide television audience of over 100 million.[123]
"Costume" often refers to a particular style of clothing worn to portray the wearer as a character or type of character at a social event in a theatrical performance on the stage or in film or television. In combination with other aspects of stagecraft, theatrical costumes can help actors portray characters' and their contexts as well as communicate information about the historical period/era, geographic location and time of day, season or weather of the theatrical performance. Some stylized theatrical costumes, such as Harlequin and Pantaloon in the Commedia dell'arte, exaggerate an aspect of a character.

Samhain/Calan Gaeaf marked the end of the harvest season and beginning of winter or the 'darker half' of the year.[44][45] Like Beltane/Calan Mai, it was seen as a liminal time, when the boundary between this world and the Otherworld thinned. This meant the Aos Sí (Connacht pronunciation /iːsˈʃiː/ eess-SHEE, Munster /e:s ʃi:/), the 'spirits' or 'fairies', could more easily come into this world and were particularly active.[46][47] Most scholars see the Aos Sí as "degraded versions of ancient gods [...] whose power remained active in the people's minds even after they had been officially replaced by later religious beliefs".[48] The Aos Sí were both respected and feared, with individuals often invoking the protection of God when approaching their dwellings.[49][50] At Samhain, it was believed that the Aos Sí needed to be propitiated to ensure that the people and their livestock survived the winter. Offerings of food and drink, or portions of the crops, were left outside for the Aos Sí.[51][52][53] The souls of the dead were also said to revisit their homes seeking hospitality.[54] Places were set at the dinner table and by the fire to welcome them.[55] The belief that the souls of the dead return home on one night of the year and must be appeased seems to have ancient origins and is found in many cultures throughout the world.[56] In 19th century Ireland, "candles would be lit and prayers formally offered for the souls of the dead. After this the eating, drinking, and games would begin".[57]


During this important event, the Celts hosted large celebrations and made animal sacrifices. They would wear various costumes, most commonly made by themselves from animal skin and heads. Some historians have noted that the Celts may have worn costumes to hide their faces and appearances. They did this not necessarily to become anonymous, but in order to change their appearances for easier communication with spirits and the dead during Samhain. By taking on the appearance of an animal rather than a human, they believed they could communicate with spirits from different worlds. It was thought that the power of the animal could be transferred onto the wearer of the costume for the Samhain festival, and could even ward off any evil spirits that might try to disturb the night.


In Scotland and Ireland, guising – children disguised in costume going from door to door for food or coins  – is a traditional Halloween custom, and is recorded in Scotland at Halloween in 1895 where masqueraders in disguise carrying lanterns made out of scooped out turnips, visit homes to be rewarded with cakes, fruit, and money.[129][147] The practice of guising at Halloween in North America is first recorded in 1911, where a newspaper in Kingston, Ontario, Canada reported children going "guising" around the neighborhood.[148]
Trick-or-treating is a customary celebration for children on Halloween. Children go in costume from house to house, asking for treats such as candy or sometimes money, with the question, "Trick or treat?" The word "trick" implies a "threat" to perform mischief on the homeowners or their property if no treat is given.[86] The practice is said to have roots in the medieval practice of mumming, which is closely related to souling.[139] John Pymm writes that "many of the feast days associated with the presentation of mumming plays were celebrated by the Christian Church."[140] These feast days included All Hallows' Eve, Christmas, Twelfth Night and Shrove Tuesday.[141][142] Mumming practiced in Germany, Scandinavia and other parts of Europe,[143] involved masked persons in fancy dress who "paraded the streets and entered houses to dance or play dice in silence".[144]
While couples costumes are about as romantic as Halloween gets these days, women used to perform "rituals" to help them find their future husbands. One crazy ritual? Women tossed apple peels over their shoulders in the hopes that they'd see the shape of their future hubby's initials on the ground. Another involved women standing in front of a mirror in a dark room and holding up a candle to see their future husband's face.

Bats and Owls– Lighting bonfires was common practice during the Halloween night. This was done in honor of the night of transitions. The bonfires attracted insects the very insects in return attracted bats and owls. Well, can you guess why the insects attracted these two night-flying creatures? Simply because insects served and until today serve as a very delicious meal for the owls and bats. Well this is the simple and basic history of the association between Halloween and bats and owls.

^ "Vigil of All Saints". Catholic News Agency. 31 October 2012. Archived from the original on 24 May 2013. Retrieved 1 November 2011. The Vigil is based on the monastic office of Vigils (or Matins), when the monks would arise in the middle of the night to pray. On major feast days, they would have an extended service of readings (scriptural, patristic, and from lives of the saints) in addition to chanting the psalms. This all would be done in the dark, of course, and was an opportunity to listen carefully to the Word of God as well as the words of the Church Fathers and great saints. The Vigil of All Saints is an adaptation of this ancient practice, using the canonical office of Compline at the end.

Plus, in a society that allegedly values racial integration, isn't there something unsettling about the idea that the closest thing to an actual black person at your party could be someone smeared with face paint and wearing an Afro wig? Leonard says this creates a false sense of diversity in at atmospheres that include "everything but the actual person, the community, and the culture." Does that sound like somewhere you'd be proud to be?
In reality, this fear is almost entirely unfounded. There are only two known cases of poisoning, and both involved relatives, according to LiveScience. In 1970, a boy died of a heroin overdose. The investigators found it on his candy, but in a twist they later discovered the boy had accidentally consumed some of his uncle's heroin stash, and the family had sprinkled some on the candy to cover up the incident.
There have been controversial costumes over the years. One that sparked enormous controversy well before Halloween 2015 is a "Caitlyn Jenner" corset costume. Despite public outcry claiming that the costume is offensive, popular retailers plan to go full steam ahead with selling the costume; one defending their conviction to sell the costume as a celebration of Jenner.[30]
Stinkoman Speed Racer Speed Racer is the title character in the classic anime Speed Racer, or Mach Go Go Go in Japan. Speed Racer, or Go Mifune, is a young stock car racer who strives to win in the cutthroat world of racing. It was one of the first anime to be imported into North America and dubbed, giving many people their first taste of Japanese animation. Giving Stinkoman the "Akira" jar will make his arm explode into a grotesque organic tendril, which is a reference to the 1988 film Akira, which is also considered an entry-level anime for new fans. Wikipedia article for Speed Racer
The goal of our online costume store isn't just to be the best costume website selling Halloween outfits; it is helping you and your family create entertainment, adventure, excitement and great memories. And with our simple Halloween site and express shipping across the USA and international, buying a costume for sale online couldn't be easier! Keep the spirit of Halloween alive - Buy your costume today!

Chris Farley and Adam Sandler knew the hysterical quotient of a big, burly lunch lady, and their over-the-top SNL sketch became an instant classic. Put your own spin on everyone's favorite foodie with props like messy lipstick, a stock pot and ladle, ugly shoes, a unibrow, missing teeth, a ginormous mole or a pair of ill-fitting stockings with a lot of runs in them. Of course, this is an epic transformation that's best served with hoagies, grinders and a side of slop-sloppy joes!
Halloween activities include trick-or-treating (or the related guising and souling), attending Halloween costume parties, carving pumpkins into jack-o'-lanterns, lighting bonfires, apple bobbing, divination games, playing pranks, visiting haunted attractions, telling scary stories, as well as watching horror films.[21] In many parts of the world, the Christian religious observances of All Hallows' Eve, including attending church services and lighting candles on the graves of the dead, remain popular,[22][23][24] although elsewhere it is a more commercial and secular celebration.[25][26][27] Some Christians historically abstained from meat on All Hallows' Eve, a tradition reflected in the eating of certain vegetarian foods on this vigil day, including apples, potato pancakes, and soul cakes.[28][29][30][31]
Due to the idea that the Protestant England never believed in Catholic saints, the customs or rituals traditionally linked to Hallowmas (or Halloween) came to be associated with Guy Fawkes Night. November 5th was declared  Guy Fawkes Night in England. This night was meant to remember the seizure and execution of Guy Fawkes, who plotter to destroy the Parliament in the year 1605 so as to order to reinstate a Catholic king.
It wasn’t until the mid-1800s that America became aware of Halloween. With a rise of Irish and English immigrants, new traditions and festivals were brought over to the USA. It didn’t take long before Americans were following the Celtic traditions of dressing up and celebrating at the end of October. They would walk around their neighborhoods asking for money or food – it wasn’t called trick-or-treating until much later, however. The beginning of the 19th century saw Halloween becoming very popular with children in North America, even though Protestants were not happy with the popularization of the pagan festival.
^ Jump up to: a b Morrow, Ed (2001). The Halloween Handbook. Kensington Publishing Corporation. p. 19. ISBN 978-0806522272. Another contributor to the custom of dressing up at Halloween was the old Irish practice of marking All Hallows' Day with religious pageants that recounted biblical events. These were common during the Middle Ages all across Europe. The featured players dressed as saints and angels, but there were also plenty of roles for demons who had more fun, capering, acting devilish, and playing to the crows. The pageant began inside the church, then moved by procession to the churchyard, where it continued long into the night.
When the Irish fled their country in the 1840s due to the potato famine, they brought their Halloween traditions with them. By the 1920s the holiday evolved to include "tricks," and the mischief reached an all-time high by The Great Depression. Some believe community-based trick-or-treating became popular in the 1930s as a way to control the excessive pranksters.
Halloween Fun Fact: William Shakespeare was the author of the poem "The Witches Spell", a fun Halloween poem. The Witches' Spell by William Shakespeare A dark Cave. In the middle, a Caldron boiling. Thunder. Enter the three Witches. 1 WITCH. Thrice the brinded cat hath mew'd. 2 WITCH. Thrice and once, the hedge-pig whin'd. 3 WITCH. Harpier cries:�'tis time! 'tis time! 1 WITCH. Round about the caldron go; In the poison'd entrails throw.� Toad, that under cold stone, Days and nights has thirty-one; Swelter'd venom sleeping got, Boil thou first i� the charmed pot! ALL. Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn, and caldron bubble. 2 WITCH. Fillet of a fenny snake, In the caldron boil and bake; Eye of newt, and toe of frog, Wool of bat, and tongue of dog, Adder's fork, and blind-worm's sting, Lizard's leg, and owlet's wing, For a charm of powerful trouble, Like a hell-broth boil and bubble. ALL. Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn, and caldron bubble. 3 WITCH. Scale of dragon; tooth of wolf; Witches' mummy; maw and gulf Of the ravin'd salt-sea shark; Root of hemlock digg'd i the dark; Liver of blaspheming Jew; Gall of goat, and slips of yew Sliver'd in the moon�s eclipse; Nose of Turk, and Tartar's lips; Finger of birth-strangled babe Ditch-deliver'd by a drab, Make the gruel thick and slab: Add thereto a tiger's chaudron, For the ingrediants of our caldron. ALL. Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn, and caldron bubble. 2 WITCH. Cool it with a baboon's blood, Then the charm is firm and good.
Halloween has always been a holiday filled with mystery, magic and superstition. It began as a Celtic end-of-summer festival during which people felt especially close to deceased relatives and friends. For these friendly spirits, they set places at the dinner table, left treats on doorsteps and along the side of the road and lit candles to help loved ones find their way back to the spirit world. https://www.halloweencostumes.com/funny-costumes.html?utm_source=543270&utm_medium=affiliate&network=ShareASale&banner_id=367112&sscid=31k3_l1x17
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