Unfortunately, like most other holidays celebrated, it’s an excuse to have a good time rather than an actual celebration. Despite this, Halloween is one of the most fun holidays to celebrate. The candy, thrills, and costumes are what make it all exciting to us. Costumes, especially costumes for children, are probably the one thing that we stress about as Halloween approaches each year. Browsing the web recently, I’ve found out some very interesting things about costumes. Let me impart to you some of my newfound knowledge.

Blackface is part of a history of dehumanization, of denied citizenship, and of efforts to excuse and justify state violence. From lynchings to mass incarceration, whites have utilized blackface (and the resulting dehumanization) as part of its moral and legal justification for violence. It is time to stop with the dismissive arguments those that describe these offensive acts as pranks, ignorance and youthful indiscretions. Blackface is never a neutral form of entertainment, but an incredibly loaded site for the production of damaging stereotypes...the same stereotypes that undergird individual and state violence, American racism, and a centuries worth of injustice.
A popular variant of trick-or-treating, known as trunk-or-treating (or Halloween tailgaiting), occurs when "children are offered treats from the trunks of cars parked in a church parking lot", or sometimes, a school parking lot.[116][156] In a trunk-or-treat event, the trunk (boot) of each automobile is decorated with a certain theme,[157] such as those of children's literature, movies, scripture, and job roles.[158] Trunk-or-treating has grown in popularity due to its perception as being more safe than going door to door, a point that resonates well with parents, as well as the fact that it "solves the rural conundrum in which homes [are] built a half-mile apart".[159][160]
In France, some Christian families, on the night of All Hallows' Eve, prayed beside the graves of their loved ones, setting down dishes full of milk for them.[102] On Halloween, in Italy, some families left a large meal out for ghosts of their passed relatives, before they departed for church services.[115] In Spain, on this night, special pastries are baked, known as "bones of the holy" (Spanish: Huesos de Santo) and put them on the graves of the churchyard, a practice that continues to this day.[116]

There have been controversial costumes over the years. One that sparked enormous controversy well before Halloween 2015 is a "Caitlyn Jenner" corset costume. Despite public outcry claiming that the costume is offensive, popular retailers plan to go full steam ahead with selling the costume; one defending their conviction to sell the costume as a celebration of Jenner.[30]
Costumes also serve as an avenue for children to explore and role-play. For example, children may dress up as characters from history or fiction, such as pirates, princesses, cowboys, or superheroes. They may also dress in uniforms used in common jobs, such as nurses, police officers, or firefighters, or as zoo or farm animals. Young boys tend to prefer costumes that reinforce stereotypical ideas of being male, and young girls tend to prefer costumes that reinforce stereotypical ideas of being female.[17]
Using pumpkins as lanterns at Halloween is based on an ancient Celtic custom brought to America by Irish immigrants. All Hallows' Eve on October 31 marked the end of the old Celtic calendar year. On that night, hollowed-out gourds with candles inside were placed on windowsills to welcome home spirits of deceased ancestors and to ward off evil spirits, including a restless soul named "Stingy Jack."
It is widely believed that many Halloween traditions originated from ancient Celtic harvest festivals, particularly the Gaelic festival Samhain; that such festivals may have had pagan roots; and that Samhain itself was Christianized as Halloween by the early Church.[12][13][14][15][16] Some believe, however, that Halloween began solely as a Christian holiday, separate from ancient festivals like Samhain.[17][18][19][20]

The haunted house as an American cultural icon can be attributed to the opening of the Haunted Mansion in Disneyland on 12 August 1969.[183] Knott's Berry Farm began hosting its own Halloween night attraction, Knott's Scary Farm, which opened in 1973.[184] Evangelical Christians adopted a form of these attractions by opening one of the first "hell houses" in 1972.[185]


In Judaism, a common practice is to dress up on Purim. During this holiday, Jews celebrate the change of their destiny. They were delivered from being the victims of an evil decree against them and were instead allowed by the King to destroy their enemies. A quote from the Book of Esther, which says: "On the contrary" (Hebrew: ונהפוך הוא‎) is the reason that wearing a costume has become customary for this holiday.
By the time Halloween made it to the 20th century, it was being celebrated in America, Canada and much of Europe. Entrepreneurs in the 1930s began to cash in on this popular holiday, which was becoming more popular in America than it was in the UK. The most popular types of costumes were mass-produced and sold in their hundreds to adults and children alike.
Kids around the world count down the days until Christmas but not Emma Rae Curtis. Ever since her first Halloween, Emma has been a huge fan of the magic that is Halloween. While raising her kids, Emma had the time of her life making Halloween costumes and hosting lively Halloween parties. Each Halloween her house is still decorated to the hilt making it a trick or treat favorite in the neighborhood. Emma is an avid researcher, reader and writer of all topics involving Halloween costumes, traditions, decorations, parties, and accessories. At the urging of her friends and family Emma has worked independently as a Halloween writer/researcher since 2001. Emma also does consulting for organizations regarding all things related to Halloween parties, Halloween costumes, and Halloween related information.
Halloween costumes are costumes worn on or around Halloween, a festival which falls on October 31. An early reference to wearing costumes at Halloween comes from Scotland in 1585, but they may pre-date this. There are many references to the custom during the 18th and 19th centuries in the Celtic countries of Scotland, Ireland, Mann and Wales. It has been suggested that the custom comes from the Celtic festivals of Samhain and Calan Gaeaf, or from the practise of "souling" during the Christian observance of Allhallowtide. Wearing costumes and mumming has long been associated with festivals at other times of the year, such as on Christmas.[1] Halloween costumes are traditionally based on frightening supernatural or folkloric beings. However, by the 1930s costumes based on characters in mass media such as film, literature, and radio were popular. Halloween costumes have tended to be worn mainly by young people, but since the mid-20th century they have been increasingly worn by adults also.

Early Halloween costumes, then, were more a matter of survival and less a matter of entertainment like the Halloween costume of today. As such, these costumes were made often made of animal skins or hides to give the illusion of a wild animal, as opposed to a human. Another popular option was to wear scary masks. The idea behind wearing as scary mask was that, in the event of being encountered by a ghost, the ghost would see the scary mask and mistake the person wearing it for a fellow ghoul. https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/holidays/halloween-ideas/g3848/pun-halloween-costume-ideas/

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