A costume technician is a term used for a person that constructs and/or alters the costumes.[7] The costume technician is responsible for taking the two dimensional sketch and translating it to create a garment that resembles the designer's rendering. It is important for a technician to keep the ideas of the designer in mind when building the garment.[8]


It’s not a secret that Candy corn is one of America’s all-time favorite Halloween candies.  About 20 million pounds of Candy corn will be sold this Halloween!  How completely corny! Candy corn is actually a pretty simple concoction made of sugar, corn syrup and water.  The crafty people at the Goelitz company add a special ingredient with marshmallow in it that gives their candy corn a truly “gourmet” taste.  The best candy corn is super sweet tasting and has an almost vanilla flavor to it.  It should be soft when you bite it (if it’s not…uh, you might not want to eat it.) It’s fun to know the facts about what you are eating and this year when you are gobbling up all that delicious candy corn—you’ll know exactly why you love it! 
Black is associated with darkness or night, death, fear and silence. Basing on the idea that All Hallows Eve was thought of as the day during which the border between the living and dead/spirit world became indistinct, the festival came to be associated with death and therefore the color of black. Even in current day, some countries associate black with death. The Americans for example mourn while dressed in black. The black color also stands for black cats, witches, bats, and vampires which play an important role in the Halloween traditions.
On route home after a night's drinking, Jack encounters the Devil and tricks him into climbing a tree. A quick-thinking Jack etches the sign of the cross into the bark, thus trapping the Devil. Jack strikes a bargain that Satan can never claim his soul. After a life of sin, drink, and mendacity, Jack is refused entry to heaven when he dies. Keeping his promise, the Devil refuses to let Jack into hell and throws a live coal straight from the fires of hell at him. It was a cold night, so Jack places the coal in a hollowed out turnip to stop it from going out, since which time Jack and his lantern have been roaming looking for a place to rest.[127]
Hindus remember the dead during the festival of Pitru Paksha, during which Hindus pay homage to and perform a ceremony "to keep the souls of their ancestors at rest". It is celebrated in the Hindu month of Bhadrapada, usually in mid-September.[238] The celebration of the Hindu festival Diwali sometimes conflicts with the date of Halloween; but some Hindus choose to participate in the popular customs of Halloween.[239] Other Hindus, such as Soumya Dasgupta, have opposed the celebration on the grounds that Western holidays like Halloween have "begun to adversely affect our indigenous festivals".[240]
For those who live to serve and protect, we salute you. When you’re out on the streets, you have to be able to move like a cheetah … a law enforcement cheetah. These short shorts leave you unrestricted, but only Reno 911's bravest and boldest (AKA Officer Dangle) could rock this look. We all understand that police work is very serious business, but you sir, are a master of comedy if you can keep a straight face in this cop's barely-there bottoms all night. 

We try not to walk under ladders for the same reason. This superstition may have come from the ancient Egyptians, who believed that triangles were sacred (it also may have something to do with the fact that walking under a leaning ladder tends to be fairly unsafe). And around Halloween, especially, we try to avoid breaking mirrors, stepping on cracks in the road or spilling salt.
The Druids believed that spirits of the dead visited their world on the Halloween night. Years ago, there was a superstition that they would arrive disguised as beggars and walk door to door asking for money during Samhain. It became a custom to not let them return empty-handed. This how trick or treating came into being. Back then, the trick or treaters were believed to be spirits and it was done at night.
^ "Night of Light Beginnings". Cor et Lumen Christi Community. Archived from the original on 23 October 2013. Retrieved 2 November 2012. In its first year – 2000 AD – over 1000 people participated from several countries. This included special All Saints Vigil masses, extended periods of Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament and parties for children. In our second year 10,000 participated. Since these modest beginnings, the Night of Light has been adopted in many countries around the world with vast numbers involved each year from a Cathedral in India to a convent in New Zealand; from Churches in the US and Europe to Africa; in Schools, churches, homes and church halls all ages have got involved. Although it began in the Catholic Church it has been taken up be other Christians who while keeping its essentials have adapted it to suit their own traditions.
My little bio is brought to you by the letter C: I’m a copywriter, card maker, and coffee drinker who just so happens to be a big fan of all things cake, chocolate, and cats. Born and bred in Switzerland (cheese, anyone?), I’ve spent most of the 21st century in North America (eating burgers). Even though I’m scared of flying, I never pass up the opportunity to pack my bags and add some stamps to my passport. Find me on Twitter with @isabellesagt
One study in particular found that unsupervised costumed children in groups were far more likely to steal candy and money than both non-costumed kids and children not in a group. Another similar study found that masked children were significantly more likely to take more Halloween candy than they were supposed to if they believed there was no adult supervision.
^ Fieldhouse, Paul (17 April 2017). Food, Feasts, and Faith: An Encyclopedia of Food Culture in World Religions. ABC-CLIO. p. 254. ISBN 978-1610694124. Archived from the original on 31 October 2017. Retrieved 13 August 2017. In Ireland, dishes based on potatoes and other vegetables were associated with Halloween, as meat was forbidden during the Catholic vigil and fast leading up to All Saint's Day.
When Jack finally died, God decided he wasn’t fit for heaven, but the Devil had promised never to claim his soul for hell. So Jack was sent off to roam Earth with only a burning coal for light. He put the coal into a turnip as a lantern, and Stingy Jack became “Jack of the Lantern” or “Jack o’ Lantern.” Based on this myth, the Irish carved scary faces into turnips, beets and potatoes to scare away Stingy Jack or any other spirits of the night.
Other sources suggest that people dressed up during the Samhain festival so that they could ask for food or money without being recognized by anybody. In the 15th century and later on, children would visit houses singing songs or reciting poetry in a bid to get fruit, cakes and money from housewives. During the celebrations, the Celts would sometimes perform in plays, which of course would require costumes.

Halloween’s origins come from a Celtic festival for the dead called “Samhain.” Celts believed the ghosts of the dead roamed Earth on this holiday, so people would dress in costumes and leave “treats” out on their front doors to appease the roaming spirits. Granted, the Celts were not solely based in Ireland when these customs started taking shape around the first century B.C., but as will be talked about more in a later section, the Irish Celts were the ones who invented the jack-o’-lantern. This Halloween prototype was eventually disrupted and adapted by Christian missionaries into celebrations closer to what we celebrate today, including partly by the not-Irish St. Patrick, whose work was later mostly recognized by Americans.

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According to Alfred J. Kolatch in the Second Jewish Book of Why, in Judaism, Halloween is not permitted by Jewish Halakha because it violates Leviticus 18:3, which forbids Jews from partaking in gentile customs. Many Jews observe Yizkor communally four times a year, which is vaguely similar to the observance of Allhallowtide in Christianity, in the sense that prayers are said for both "martyrs and for one's own family".[232] Nevertheless, many American Jews celebrate Halloween, disconnected from its Christian origins.[233] Reform Rabbi Jeffrey Goldwasser has said that "There is no religious reason why contemporary Jews should not celebrate Halloween" while Orthodox Rabbi Michael Broyde has argued against Jews observing the holiday.[234] Jews do have the holiday of Purim, where the children dress up in costumes to celebrate.[235]
It's been said that it's bad luck for a black cat to cross your path, especially on Halloween night. In the U.S., this superstition stems from the Protestant beliefs of the Puritan Pilgrims of Plymouth Colony. They disapproved of anything associated with witchcraft, and some believed the legend that witches could transform into black cats and back — hence the inspiration for pop culture characters like Salem on Sabrina the Teenage Witch and Binx in Hocus Pocus.
Dressing up in costumes and going "guising" was prevalent in Scotland and Ireland at Halloween by the late 19th century.[129] A Scottish term, the tradition is called "guising" because of the disguises or costumes worn by the children.[147] In Ireland the masks are known as 'false faces'.[161] Costuming became popular for Halloween parties in the US in the early 20th century, as often for adults as for children. The first mass-produced Halloween costumes appeared in stores in the 1930s when trick-or-treating was becoming popular in the United States.

In reality, this fear is almost entirely unfounded. There are only two known cases of poisoning, and both involved relatives, according to LiveScience. In 1970, a boy died of a heroin overdose. The investigators found it on his candy, but in a twist they later discovered the boy had accidentally consumed some of his uncle's heroin stash, and the family had sprinkled some on the candy to cover up the incident.
From its vampy costumes and sweet treats to spooky outdoor decor, Halloween is a big business. So big, in fact, that it's the second-largest commercial holiday in America, with Christmas being the only one to surpass it in sales. According to the National Retail Federation, consumers spent $5.8 billion on Halloween in 2010, and by 2015, that figure jumped to nearly $7 billion.
The thousands of Halloween postcards produced between the turn of the 20th century and the 1920s commonly show children but not trick-or-treating.[153] Trick-or-treating does not seem to have become a widespread practice until the 1930s, with the first US appearances of the term in 1934,[154] and the first use in a national publication occurring in 1939.[155]

Most experts trace trick-or-treating to the European practice of “mumming,” or “guysing,” in which costume-wearing participants would go door-to-door performing choreographed dances, songs and plays in exchange for treats. According to Elizabeth Pleck’s “Celebrating The Family,” the tradition cropped up in America, where it would often take place on Thanksgiving.
^ Fieldhouse, Paul (17 April 2017). Food, Feasts, and Faith: An Encyclopedia of Food Culture in World Religions. ABC-CLIO. p. 254. ISBN 978-1610694124. Archived from the original on 31 October 2017. Retrieved 13 August 2017. In Ireland, dishes based on potatoes and other vegetables were associated with Halloween, as meat was forbidden during the Catholic vigil and fast leading up to All Saint's Day.

The word Halloween or Hallowe'en dates to about 1745[32] and is of Christian origin.[33] The word "Hallowe'en" means "Saints' evening".[34] It comes from a Scottish term for All Hallows' Eve (the evening before All Hallows' Day).[35] In Scots, the word "eve" is even, and this is contracted to e'en or een. Over time, (All) Hallow(s) E(v)en evolved into Hallowe'en. Although the phrase "All Hallows'" is found in Old English "All Hallows' Eve" is itself not seen until 1556.[35][36]
Halloween has always been a holiday filled with mystery, magic and superstition. It began as a Celtic end-of-summer festival during which people felt especially close to deceased relatives and friends. For these friendly spirits, they set places at the dinner table, left treats on doorsteps and along the side of the road and lit candles to help loved ones find their way back to the spirit world.
While couples costumes are about as romantic as Halloween gets these days, women used to perform "rituals" to help them find their future husbands. One crazy ritual? Women tossed apple peels over their shoulders in the hopes that they'd see the shape of their future hubby's initials on the ground. Another involved women standing in front of a mirror in a dark room and holding up a candle to see their future husband's face.
All the colors of the rainbow are represented by this amazing group costume idea. Perfect for grade school trunk-or-treating and family outings, this look is very photo-friendly. The crayons are sure to be a hit. Why? Cause color is a big part of funny Halloween costumes for kids. Be sure and ask your kiddos, maybe you’ll end up with a Blue toddler (only in color, hopefully) or maybe she’ll be a rad red crayon. Now, we’re sure the parents can come to terms with being a pink or a blue crayon but we’re sure you’ll have fun either way.

One study in particular found that unsupervised costumed children in groups were far more likely to steal candy and money than both non-costumed kids and children not in a group. Another similar study found that masked children were significantly more likely to take more Halloween candy than they were supposed to if they believed there was no adult supervision.
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Unfortunately, like most other holidays celebrated, it’s an excuse to have a good time rather than an actual celebration. Despite this, Halloween is one of the most fun holidays to celebrate. The candy, thrills, and costumes are what make it all exciting to us. Costumes, especially costumes for children, are probably the one thing that we stress about as Halloween approaches each year. Browsing the web recently, I’ve found out some very interesting things about costumes. Let me impart to you some of my newfound knowledge.
The following activities were a common feature of Halloween in Ireland and Britain during the 17th–20th centuries. Some have become more widespread and continue to be popular today. One common game is apple bobbing or dunking (which may be called "dooking" in Scotland)[169] in which apples float in a tub or a large basin of water and the participants must use only their teeth to remove an apple from the basin. A variant of dunking involves kneeling on a chair, holding a fork between the teeth and trying to drive the fork into an apple. Another common game involves hanging up treacle or syrup-coated scones by strings; these must be eaten without using hands while they remain attached to the string, an activity that inevitably leads to a sticky face. Another once-popular game involves hanging a small wooden rod from the ceiling at head height, with a lit candle on one end and an apple hanging from the other. The rod is spun round and everyone takes turns to try to catch the apple with their teeth.[170]
^ Moser, Stefan (29 October 2010). "Kein 'Trick or Treat' bei Salzburgs Kelten" (in German). Salzburger Nachrichten. Archived from the original on 17 March 2014. Retrieved 11 August 2017. Die Kelten haben gar nichts mit Halloween zu tun", entkräftet Stefan Moser, Direktor des Keltenmuseums Hallein, einen weit verbreiteten Mythos. Moser sieht die Ursprünge von Halloween insgesamt in einem christlichen Brauch, nicht in einem keltischen.
Strong Mad Magnum, P.I. Magnum, P.I. was a television show set in Hawaii that ran from 1980 until 1988. Strong Mad is dressed as Thomas Magnum, the title character played by Tom Selleck who worked as a private detective. Magnum was frequently seen wearing flowered shirts and was a Detroit Tigers fan, hence the costume. Wikipedia article for Magnum P.I.
There have been controversial costumes over the years. One that sparked enormous controversy well before Halloween 2015 is a "Caitlyn Jenner" corset costume. Despite public outcry claiming that the costume is offensive, popular retailers plan to go full steam ahead with selling the costume; one defending their conviction to sell the costume as a celebration of Jenner.[30]

There have been controversial costumes over the years. One that sparked enormous controversy well before Halloween 2015 is a "Caitlyn Jenner" corset costume. Despite public outcry claiming that the costume is offensive, popular retailers plan to go full steam ahead with selling the costume; one defending their conviction to sell the costume as a celebration of Jenner.[30]
Big Toons Homestarloween Party (costumes), The House That Gave Sucky Treats (costumes), Pumpkin Carve-nival (costumes), 3 Times Halloween Funjob (costumes), Halloween Fairstival (costumes), Halloween Potion-ma-jig (costumes), Happy Hallow-day (costumes), Jibblies 2 (costumes), Most in the Graveyard (costumes), Doomy Tales of the Macabre (costumes), Which Ween Costumes? (costumes), I Killed Pom Pom (costumes), The House That Gave Sucky Tricks (costumes), Later That Night... (costumes), Haunted Photo Booth (costumes), Mr. Poofers Must Die (costumes)

[32] Researchers conducted a survey for the National Retail Federation in the United States and found that 53.3 percent of consumers planned to buy a costume for Halloween 2005, spending $38.11 on average (up $10 from the year before). They were also expected to spend $4.96 billion in 2006, up significantly from just $3.3 billion the previous year.[33] The troubled economy has caused many Americans to cut back on Halloween spending. In 2009, the National Retail Federation anticipated that American households would decrease Halloween spending by as much as 15% to $56.31.[34] In 2013, Americans spent an estimated $6.9 billion to celebrate Halloween, including a predicted $2.6 billion on costumes (with more spent on adult costumes than for children's costumes) and $330 million on pet costumes.[35][36] In 2017 it was estimated that Americans would spend $9.1 billion on Halloween merchandise with $3.4 billion of that being on spend on Halloween costumes.[37]


Speaking of funny, have you taken a look at the Where’s Waldo books recently? Those books are chock-full of situational comedy. Look closely and you might spot a kid getting attacked by a plant, Vikings building sandcastles, or a human zoo with animal visitors. If Waldo is the destination, then the hilarious characters along the way make finding him a blast. This is exactly it’s hilarious to dress as Waldo when you’re headed into a crowd. Make your State Fair scene hilarious when you’re spotted throwing a ball at the dunk tank. Get people to do a double take at their photos of Oktoberfest when you show up in the background eating a pretzel. You see, easy funny Halloween costumes are one thing, finding an ensemble that you can break out throughout the year is something else entirely. This classic striped look will have everyone asking, “Waldo? Where?” no matter what kind event you’re headed to!

Sheikh Idris Palmer, author of A Brief Illustrated Guide to Understanding Islam, has argued that Muslims should not participate in Halloween, stating that "participation in Halloween is worse than participation in Christmas, Easter, ... it is more sinful than congratulating the Christians for their prostration to the crucifix".[236] Javed Memon, a Muslim writer, has disagreed, saying that his "daughter dressing up like a British telephone booth will not destroy her faith as a Muslim".[237]

The main traditional Halloween colors are Orange and black. However, green, red and purple have become popular  on October 31. These three colors mainly appear on Halloween decorations and are also usually used in party themes of All Hallows Eve.  Halloween participants have been observed disguised in costumes and masks that have these colors. At the same time, the very colors make appearances on candy, supplies or gifts. You will notice that these items are wrapped or packaged  in either red, orange, black, green, purple etc. Let us have a look at how these colors are associated with Halloween.
Wearing costumes for Halloween and trick-or-treating are things that kids of all ages look forward to, but we believe the fun should last year round not just the 31st of October. Fancy dress costumes represent adventure, fantasy and imagination. When wearing an awesome kids costume, children can fly like a costumed superhero, bring video games to life, imagine they are a ninja, cowboy or astronaut or be their favorite Disney Princess costume any time they like. We know that kids are more in touch with trends and popular characters than ever before, so we stay one-step ahead by offering the latest licensed themed outfits for sale as soon as they hit the market. So keep the spirit of Halloween alive and buy costumes for the whole family.
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