My little bio is brought to you by the letter C: I’m a copywriter, card maker, and coffee drinker who just so happens to be a big fan of all things cake, chocolate, and cats. Born and bred in Switzerland (cheese, anyone?), I’ve spent most of the 21st century in North America (eating burgers). Even though I’m scared of flying, I never pass up the opportunity to pack my bags and add some stamps to my passport. Find me on Twitter with @isabellesagt
Young women tossed apple-peels over their shoulders, hoping that the peels would fall on the floor in the shape of their future husbands’ initials; tried to learn about their futures by peering at egg yolks floating in a bowl of water; and stood in front of mirrors in darkened rooms, holding candles and looking over their shoulders for their husbands’ faces.
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In Colonial America, where the changing of seasons is similar to the changes that occur in the UK, the spread of Halloween to America was seamless. The influence of Native Americans and Native American lore, however, added a new element to Halloween costumes in America. The integration of face paint into costumes began to increase, as did the variety of animal skins used in costumes.
The first was Feralia, a day in late October when the Romans traditionally commemorated the passing of the dead. The second was a day to honor Pomona, the Roman goddess of fruit and trees. The symbol of Pomona is the apple, and the incorporation of this celebration into Samhain probably explains the tradition of “bobbing” for apples that is practiced today on Halloween.

^ Hughes, Rebekkah (29 October 2014). "Happy Hallowe'en Surrey!" (PDF). The Stag. University of Surrey. p. 1. Archived from the original (PDF) on 19 November 2015. Retrieved 31 October 2015. Halloween or Hallowe'en, is the yearly celebration on October 31st that signifies the first day of Allhallowtide, being the time to remember the dead, including martyrs, saints and all faithful departed Christians.


The modern imagery of Halloween comes from many sources, including Christian eschatology, national customs, works of Gothic and horror literature (such as the novels Frankenstein and Dracula) and classic horror films (such as Frankenstein and The Mummy).[132][133] Imagery of the skull, a reference to Golgotha in the Christian tradition, serves as "a reminder of death and the transitory quality of human life" and is consequently found in memento mori and vanitas compositions;[134] skulls have therefore been commonplace in Halloween, which touches on this theme.[135] Traditionally, the back walls of churches are "decorated with a depiction of the Last Judgment, complete with graves opening and the dead rising, with a heaven filled with angels and a hell filled with devils", a motif that has permeated the observance of this triduum.[136] One of the earliest works on the subject of Halloween is from Scottish poet John Mayne, who, in 1780, made note of pranks at Halloween; "What fearfu' pranks ensue!", as well as the supernatural associated with the night, "Bogies" (ghosts), influencing Robert Burns' "Halloween" (1785).[137] Elements of the autumn season, such as pumpkins, corn husks, and scarecrows, are also prevalent. Homes are often decorated with these types of symbols around Halloween. Halloween imagery includes themes of death, evil, and mythical monsters.[138] Black, orange, and sometimes purple are Halloween's traditional colors.
^ Döring, Dr. Volkskundler Alois (2011). "Süßes, Saures – olle Kamellen? Ist Halloween schon wieder out?" (in German). Westdeutscher Rundfunk. Archived from the original on 14 June 2011. Retrieved 12 November 2015. Dr. Alois Döring ist wissenschaftlicher Referent für Volkskunde beim LVR-Institut für Landeskunde und Regionalgeschichte Bonn. Er schrieb zahlreiche Bücher über Bräuche im Rheinland, darunter das Nachschlagewerk "Rheinische Bräuche durch das Jahr". Darin widerspricht Döring der These, Halloween sei ursprünglich ein keltisch-heidnisches Totenfest. Vielmehr stamme Halloween von den britischen Inseln, der Begriff leite sich ab von "All Hallows eve", Abend vor Allerheiligen. Irische Einwanderer hätten das Fest nach Amerika gebracht, so Döring, von wo aus es als "amerikanischer" Brauch nach Europa zurückkehrte.
Plus, in a society that allegedly values racial integration, isn't there something unsettling about the idea that the closest thing to an actual black person at your party could be someone smeared with face paint and wearing an Afro wig? Leonard says this creates a false sense of diversity in at atmospheres that include "everything but the actual person, the community, and the culture." Does that sound like somewhere you'd be proud to be?
The following activities were a common feature of Halloween in Ireland and Britain during the 17th–20th centuries. Some have become more widespread and continue to be popular today. One common game is apple bobbing or dunking (which may be called "dooking" in Scotland)[169] in which apples float in a tub or a large basin of water and the participants must use only their teeth to remove an apple from the basin. A variant of dunking involves kneeling on a chair, holding a fork between the teeth and trying to drive the fork into an apple. Another common game involves hanging up treacle or syrup-coated scones by strings; these must be eaten without using hands while they remain attached to the string, an activity that inevitably leads to a sticky face. Another once-popular game involves hanging a small wooden rod from the ceiling at head height, with a lit candle on one end and an apple hanging from the other. The rod is spun round and everyone takes turns to try to catch the apple with their teeth.[170]
It's been said that it's bad luck for a black cat to cross your path, especially on Halloween night. In the U.S., this superstition stems from the Protestant beliefs of the Puritan Pilgrims of Plymouth Colony. They disapproved of anything associated with witchcraft, and some believed the legend that witches could transform into black cats and back — hence the inspiration for pop culture characters like Salem on Sabrina the Teenage Witch and Binx in Hocus Pocus.
In the late 1980s and early 1990s, theme parks entered the business seriously. Six Flags Fright Fest began in 1986 and Universal Studios Florida began Halloween Horror Nights in 1991. Knott's Scary Farm experienced a surge in attendance in the 1990s as a result of America's obsession with Halloween as a cultural event. Theme parks have played a major role in globalizing the holiday. Universal Studios Singapore and Universal Studios Japan both participate, while Disney now mounts Mickey's Not-So-Scary Halloween Party events at its parks in Paris, Hong Kong and Tokyo, as well as in the United States.[194] The theme park haunts are by far the largest, both in scale and attendance.[195]
Who is a witch? Somebody with alleged magic powers. Witches represent the supernatural. In the ancient times, witches were to handle anything to do with unseen energies. Their skills, perspectives and expertise were sought during this festival for help in understanding and interpreting messages from the non-physical side of life in addition to forecasts for the coming seasons.
When the Skater's winter costume is equipped, he wears a red bobble hat with a red pompom, and ice skates rather than roller skates. He is officially known as the Ice Skater when wearing his winter costume. There is an achievement Figure Skater which can only be earned with the Ice Skater, and the achievement Ramping Up is easiest with the Ice Skater.
The modern imagery of Halloween comes from many sources, including Christian eschatology, national customs, works of Gothic and horror literature (such as the novels Frankenstein and Dracula) and classic horror films (such as Frankenstein and The Mummy).[132][133] Imagery of the skull, a reference to Golgotha in the Christian tradition, serves as "a reminder of death and the transitory quality of human life" and is consequently found in memento mori and vanitas compositions;[134] skulls have therefore been commonplace in Halloween, which touches on this theme.[135] Traditionally, the back walls of churches are "decorated with a depiction of the Last Judgment, complete with graves opening and the dead rising, with a heaven filled with angels and a hell filled with devils", a motif that has permeated the observance of this triduum.[136] One of the earliest works on the subject of Halloween is from Scottish poet John Mayne, who, in 1780, made note of pranks at Halloween; "What fearfu' pranks ensue!", as well as the supernatural associated with the night, "Bogies" (ghosts), influencing Robert Burns' "Halloween" (1785).[137] Elements of the autumn season, such as pumpkins, corn husks, and scarecrows, are also prevalent. Homes are often decorated with these types of symbols around Halloween. Halloween imagery includes themes of death, evil, and mythical monsters.[138] Black, orange, and sometimes purple are Halloween's traditional colors.
Now, in 2016, the total spending on adult Halloween costumes each year in America is a staggering $1.5 billion. Children’s costumes bring in almost as much revenue, with a total of approximately $1.2 billion. While there are a huge variety of costumes in the modern day, the most popular are still the traditional costumes related to the Halloween festival of Samhain. Witches are the most common outfits bought by adults, followed closely by vampires, skeletons, cats and other animals. From the 1980s and beyond, TV characters, celebrities and famous singers are among the costumes worn at Halloween. Nowadays, it is common practice to wear any kind of costume for the Halloween celebrations, and thousands of people dress as characters or objects which are in no way related to the traditions Samhain festival.
Due to the idea that the Protestant England never believed in Catholic saints, the customs or rituals traditionally linked to Hallowmas (or Halloween) came to be associated with Guy Fawkes Night. November 5th was declared  Guy Fawkes Night in England. This night was meant to remember the seizure and execution of Guy Fawkes, who plotter to destroy the Parliament in the year 1605 so as to order to reinstate a Catholic king.
Other Protestant Christians also celebrate All Hallows' Eve as Reformation Day, a day to remember the Protestant Reformation, alongside All Hallow's Eve or independently from it.[215][216] This is because Martin Luther is said to have nailed his Ninety-Five Theses to All Saints' Church in Wittenberg on All Hallows' Eve.[217] Often, "Harvest Festivals" or "Reformation Festivals" are held on All Hallows' Eve, in which children dress up as Bible characters or Reformers.[218] In addition to distributing candy to children who are trick-or-treating on Hallowe'en, many Christians also provide gospel tracts to them. One organization, the American Tract Society, stated that around 3 million gospel tracts are ordered from them alone for Hallowe'en celebrations.[219] Others order Halloween-themed Scripture Candy to pass out to children on this day.[220][221]

Pizza RatA hungry varmint nicknamed Pizza Rat captivated our hearts this summer with his determination to make off with a slice bigger than himself. It's one of those meme-worthy moments that makes for a great Halloween costume idea. Wear your best gray sweatsuit, slap on a rat nose from Party City and swipe a slice of pie from the party table, perhaps carrying it in your new portable pizza pouch. Voila!
My little bio is brought to you by the letter C: I’m a copywriter, card maker, and coffee drinker who just so happens to be a big fan of all things cake, chocolate, and cats. Born and bred in Switzerland (cheese, anyone?), I’ve spent most of the 21st century in North America (eating burgers). Even though I’m scared of flying, I never pass up the opportunity to pack my bags and add some stamps to my passport. Find me on Twitter with @isabellesagt
Other sources suggest that people dressed up during the Samhain festival so that they could ask for food or money without being recognized by anybody. In the 15th century and later on, children would visit houses singing songs or reciting poetry in a bid to get fruit, cakes and money from housewives. During the celebrations, the Celts would sometimes perform in plays, which of course would require costumes.
Homestar Runner John McEnroe John McEnroe was a professional tennis player regarded as one of the better players of his day. Effective as both a singles and doubles player, winning both tournaments at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open multiple times, McEnroe won over 70 titles in both disciplines and was the first player to be ranked as both the top singles player and the top doubles player in the world. He was just as widely known for arguing intensely with chair umpires and line judges when he felt they missed a call, and also for the afro hairstyle he sported for much of his early career. Wikipedia article for John McEnroe https://www.pinterest.com/coolestparties/funny-halloween-costumes/
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